When should I consider a collaborative divorce?

Collaborative divorce — a divorce where the partners reach an agreement without going to court — is a great option when children are involved. Collaborative divorce is the way to go, if you want an amicable separation that will allow you and your partner to work together in parenting your child.

Boulder divorce attorney Sara Ross has vast experienced on collaborative divorce, and is willing to help spouses who want a litigation-free divorce. Call her for a consultation.


Sara Ross: “Particularly people with children. The key to co-parenting successfully after a divorce, whether you go collaborative or litigated, whether you take either one of those routes, is to learn how to forgive your spouse, work on that at least, and learn how to put your children first. In the collaborative process, we work really hard to help people come to that spot.

But it’s also important that each person be able to, to a certain degree, put themselves in the other person’s shoes. The collaborative process really only works if there can be some empathy for the other person on both sides. That doesn’t mean that you understand the other person or that you think that their positions are fair or reasonable, but that you can imagine what it might be like to be where they are. That’s part of how we make sure the collaborative process works.

Sometimes if the lawyers are not sure whether the folks are a good match for collaborative, we’ll have them meet with a mental health professional called a coach. That person is fortunately a lot less expensive than the attorneys. Instead of spending a lot of money trying to hash out a lot of emotional issues with your attorney, you have the option of working with the mental health professional coach, who not only has the mental health training that the lawyer doesn’t, but is also less expensive.”